Eremophila Images

Eremophilas are a very variable genus of plants. They vary in size from prostrate ground covers to small shrubby trees, that vary in the colour of foliage from grey white to deep greens and also in flower colours which includes white, blue, purple, green, yellow, red, pink and apricot etc.

Here’s just a few of the eremophilas I have in flower at the moment in my garden. I though it might be interesting to show how if you wanted to you could nearly build a drought proof garden with just Eremophilas and never get bored.

Eremophilas are very drought tolerant and respond well to pruning after their flowering which encourages a bushier plant that produces lots of flowers the following season.

Eremophila Alternifolia x Maculata Flower

Eremophila Alternifolia x Maculata Flower

Eremophila Biserrata, makes a thick low ground cover.

Eremophila Biserrata, makes a thick low ground cover.

Eremophila Biserrata Flowers and Foliage

Eremophila Biserrata Flowers and Foliage

Eremophila Eriocalyx Flowers

Eremophila Eriocalyx Flowers

Eremophila Glabra

Eremophila Glabra

Eremophila Glabra Protrate Green Flowers

Eremophila Glabra Protrate Green Flowers, growing over Eremophila Biserrata

Eremophila Hillii Flowers

Eremophila Hillii Flowers

Eremophila Hillii in flower

Eremophila Hillii in flower

Eremophila Kalbarri Carpet, low ground cover.

Eremophila Kalbarri Carpet, low ground cover.

Eremophila Kalbarri Carpet Flowers

Eremophila Kalbarri Carpet Flowers

Eremophila Maculata Apricot Flowers

Eremophila Maculata Apricot Flowers

Eremophila Maculata "Aurea" flowers

Eremophila Maculata "Aurea" flowers

Eremophila Maculata Pink Flowers

Eremophila Maculata Pink, or so the label said. Eremophila Laanii might becloser to the mark though? Flowers during winter and into spring. Very floriferous.

Eremophila Maculata Red

Eremophila Maculata Red

Eremophila Maculata Red Flowers

Eremophila Maculata Red Flowers

Eremophila Maculata subsp Brevifolia

Eremophila Maculata subsp Brevifolia is how this Eremophila was labeled but the leaves don't resemble brevifolia. This is very floriferous and has a very long flowering season from winter right though to summer.

Eremophila Maculata subsp Brevifolia flowers

Eremophila Maculata subsp Brevifolia flowers. This photo doesn't do justice to the colour of these flowers, as they are nearly flouresant. This plant may be called "Valentine" in the USA?

Eremophila Maculata Thundercloud Flowers

Eremophila Maculata Thundercloud Flowers

Eremophila Maculata "Winter Gold"

Eremophila Maculata "Winter Gold". A much better flowerer than "Aurea". It is very floriferous and these bright yellow buds remain unopened for quite a while before opening into a paler yellow flower.

Eremophila Oppositifolia flower buds

Eremophila Oppositifolia flower buds

Eremophila Oppositifolia Flowers

Eremophila Oppositifolia Flowers

Eremophila Racemosa Flowers

Eremophila Racemosa Flowers start off orange and then open into a pink colour. Flowers in spring and into summer and puts on quite a display. It is quick growing but the branches are brittle but if you keep it out of strong winds you won't have a problem.

Eremophila Subtereifolia, low bushy groundcover.

Eremophila Subtereifolia, low bushy groundcover.

Eremophila "Yanna Road" Flowers

Eremophila "Yanna Road" Flowers

“Australia’s Eremophilas” a Highly Recommended reference book for the Eremophila enthusiast and Home Gardener

Australias Eremophilas

An up to date Reference of Australia’s Eremophilas written by Experts. Contains a brief description, extensive cultivation and growing hints and additional notes for each of the 216 described species of Eremophila. Also includes many hybrids and cultivars with information on pests and diseases, propagating from cuttings, seed and how to graft. It contains 270 pages of information and is packed full beautiful glossy photos.

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25 Responses to Eremophila Images

  • Noelle says:

    Hello Mike,
    I have not seen Eremophila grown as a groundcover – wish we had that here in Arizona. I do have the Eremophila maculata ‘Pink’, which I love.

  • elephant's eye says:

    What a wide range of colours! Is this an Australian plant?

  • Rebel Gardener says:

    Yes they mainly thrive in arid areas of inland Australia. The name loosely translates as “Desert Loving” so most are very drought tolerant. I think they are very underused in gardens as they have so many outstanding feature. The one’s shown above are really just the tip of the iceberg.
    http://www.gardeningnativeplants.com/eremophilas/

  • Margaret Blake says:

    Eremophila subtereifolia makes a lovely plant when grown in a hollow log. I have one growing in a stump 900mm high and it now to the ground.

  • Rebel Gardener says:

    Wow what a great idea. It makes such a wonderfully dense ground cover to suppress weeds but what you’ve done is make it even more interesting again.

  • Tony says:

    You’ve sold me on Eremophila’s! Great pictures and a good resource…thanks!

  • Rebel Gardener says:

    Thanks Tony

  • Geri Barr says:

    I saw Erimophila Hygrophana on Gardening Australia and thought it the answer to a native drought tolerant solution to our dead lawn. While searching for more information I happily found your website. Fabulous! What a great site. I’ll look through in more detail when not so tired. Do you think the native I mention is good for large areas of ground instead of a lawn? We live in inner city Melbourne. Bit prickly on the feet I imagine? I guess we could put in a couple and have crushed rock paths going around them… Thanks Tony!

  • Rebel Gardener says:

    Hi Tony

    Eremophila Biserrata would be best as a lawn alternative and Eremophila Subtereifolia would also be ok for smaller areas. Neither though are suitable for lots of foot traffic but if you used paths as you suggested that would be ok.

  • roughbarked says:

    I’ve been growing Eremophila species for 30 years.
    Eremophila biserrata like any plant requires water. It would never make it into a lawn like state without lawn like watering.

    Contrary to popular belief natives are plants too and no plant will perform without the required levels of aqua.

    Admittedly Eremophila species respond to water more rapidly than many plants but they still need the stuff.

  • Rebel Gardener says:

    Hi Roughbarked, thanks for your comment. You’re 100% correct about Eremophilas requiring water. I don’t know of any plants that can survive without it.
    The fact is though they do require considerably less than most other plants. You only have to look at their natural environment. They grow naturally in areas that can go for months without rainfall.
    I’ve got a small lawn area of Palmetto Buffalo grass in my backyard which is a fairly drought tolerant lawn. I know for a fact that it needs a lot more water that the Eremophila Biserratas I have growng in my garden. In fact I don’t water any of my Eremophilas. They all just survive on my annual rainfall of about 300mm.
    Therefore if someone wanted to grow Eremophila Biserrata as a lawn alternative I’d have no hesitation in recommending it. As long as they followed what I suggested above and didn’t subject it foot traffic.

  • roughbarked says:

    My annual average is 300 mm as well and yes Eremophila biserrata may grow here and cover the ground well but it needs to have a drip feed of water.

    It will not survive here without supplementary water. Will not be able to make up for the loss of foliage on every high UV day. Buffalo lawn is considerably more resistant to direct sun.
    So though I’m all for planting Eremophila, there is more to growing each species than meets the eye. I would not water my buffalo lawn more than once every month or so. The lawn gets full sun. I have to hide Eremohila biserrata under shrubs to get it to stay alive let alone grow.

  • Rebel Gardener says:

    It sounds unusual your description of E biserrata. I can only suggest that maybe the nursery you bought it from mislabeled E serpens as E biserrata. E serpens is very similar in appearance and growth habit but does require some extra water. It wouldn’t be the first time similar plants have been confused when labeled in a nursery?

  • grace basten says:

    I am looking at the 1st picture in Eremophlia Images. It showes the name eremophlia alternifolia x maculata which have one but I wish to order another so I need the correct name. I have about 5 which are on this page. I think they are great plants. Especially in our hot climate

    • Rebel Gardener says:

      Hi Grace the plant in question is “Magneta Dream syn Blue Thunder”. I bought mine from Bunnings and from memory it was under the “Garden Assets” range. It certainly does have very showy flowers but they are rather sparse on my plants. Not sure if it’s typical with this plant or if it doesn’t prefer my conditions. It does appear to be fairly hardy though.

  • jane says:

    will Eremophila Biserrata and Eremophila Subtereifolia grow in the subtropics of the Byron hinterland or will there be too much water?

    • Rebel Gardener says:

      Jane it’s one of things you could always try. I’d plant them in a raised bed where excess water can drain away and where they are not hemmed in by larger plants that stop the air flow.

  • peter says:

    re. photo maculata subsp. brevifolia.?? try maculata x maculata x brevifolia
    pete

  • Neil Fitzgerald says:

    Hello we reside in tea tree gully adelaide sa and wish to plant eremophila around our new bird bath. Needs to be 600 high x1500 wide (similar to correa reflexa..) plus we want to plant another type same dimensions and we wish to shape it. Would like a nice grey foliage on one of them. Can you help ?

    • admin says:

      I’d try Eremophila Nivea. It’s often difficult to recommend certain plants as not all plants are obviously available in all nurseries and locations. I’d find some good local native plant nurseries and see what stock they have available. Nivea is pretty common though, so hopefully it should be easy to source.

  • Julie says:

    Hi

    I have an Eremophila Nivea and I live in Southern Spain. I think this plant is simply beautiful but recently it has started to develop a black like substance all over it’s leaves. I’m really worried it’s caught a disease….any suggestions most welcome.

  • Phil Hempel says:

    Would be interested in your comments on the web site mentioned and if you have visited the Facebook page “Eremophila Growers”

    • admin says:

      Yes I think this is a very valuable resource and salute your efforts. Eremophilas are a very worthy garden plant and in my opinion very underused by the nursery industry. It is groups like yours that are used to preserve a fantastic species. Here’s the facebook page if anyone has anything to contribute. Why not get involved. http://www.facebook.com/groups/259229740837770/

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